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Popularity of pop-up restaurants is growing

09 | 11 | 12

Pop-up restaurants appear to be all the rage at the moment and the temporary eateries are adding a great deal of variety to the UK's towns and cities.

Whether you are in Glasgow, London, Cardiff or anywhere else, there are always exciting new establishments springing up throughout the nation.

There is something very hip and retro about dining in a make-shift environment and many of the ventures that start off in this way often go on to become permanent fixtures.

According to the Shepton Mallet Journal, a new pop-up restaurant is set to be launched in the town's Kilver Court.

Stage 1 will use reclaimed props and artefacts to create a British film set theme and it will open its doors to the public on November 16th.

It has been pioneered by up-cycling enthusiasts Lynn and Duncan McFarlane, who essentially take unwanted pieces of scrap and transform them into something new and exciting.

The restaurant will be open from Tuesdays to Sundays and all of the decorative film set items will be auctioned off for charity once the pop-up eventually closes.

Big Hospitality recently reported the pop-up is fast becoming a "new weapon" in achieving a permanent site.

Once you have secured a location, some adequate catering equipment and the necessary staff and licences, you can take your culinary ideologies to the masses.

Pop-ups are essentially a case of trial and error, a dress rehearsal for a permanent eatery if you like.

Owners with ambitions of opening an innovative new establishment can gauge people's opinions by setting up in temporary surroundings to start with. Some eateries - particularly those that are based on a slightly wacky or unfamiliar concept - will inevitably fail to capture the public's imagination.

Seemingly springing up out of nowhere also draws attention to restaurants and owners can use this exposure to build their brand identity.

Director of development leasing at leisure property specialist Davis Coffer Lyons Tracey Mills told Big Hospitality that "pop-up to permanent" is a trend that is likely to continue.ADNFCR-16001031-ID-801485462-ADNFCR


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