Please note: This site use cookies. Some cookies are essential to ensure our website works for you in the best possible way. You may delete and block all cookies from this site, but parts of the site may not work. To find out more about cookies on this website and how to delete cookies, Click here to see our cookie statement. .
Skip to content

Is more independent testing of catering equipment needed?

05 | 12 | 12

The energy efficiency of catering equipment should be a central concern of many restaurants, with more independent testing needed to ensure all items are as green as possible, according to an industry expert.

Laura Kirk, marketing manager for fridge manufacturer Forster, declared that energy efficiency is of paramount importance to many businesses, especially in the economic climate currently prevalent across the UK.

With fuel bills on the up and energy prices also rising, it is increasingly crucial for catering firms to keep their outgoings to a minimum by investing in energy-saving measures and ensuring their equipment is up to scratch.

Writing for Catering Insight, Ms Kirk argued "vigorous testing that will provide meaningful and independent data to consumers" should be a central part of the manufacturing process, ensuring that businesses can choose the best item for their needs.

She argued that the current marketplace can lack clarity, especially because much of the testing is carried out in-house by manufacturers and can be confusing or misleading to prospective purchasers.

"Buyers are left to compare and contrast a plethora of what can only be 'less than independent' claims from the manufacturers themselves," added the marketing manager.

The Ecodesign Directive being introduced in 2014 by the EU will help standardise manufacturer testing to some extent but still leaves room for uncertainty and a lack of external verification.

With this in mind, Ms Kirk pointed to independent and consumer-focused tests as the best way to ensure all equipment is as efficient as possible.

"The catering industry should demand to see more independent testing of products right across its equipment and supply base, with a view to bringing the decision-making process far more into line with other sectors," concluded the Forster executive.

Carbon Trust claims that the catering sector can save £90 million a year through introducing energy efficiency measures.ADNFCR-16001031-ID-801501052-ADNFCR


PageID: 9

BasketID: 0

AgentID: 371

VisitorID: 18273599