Please note: This site use cookies. Some cookies are essential to ensure our website works for you in the best possible way. You may delete and block all cookies from this site, but parts of the site may not work. To find out more about cookies on this website and how to delete cookies, Click here to see our cookie statement. .
Skip to content

Wine consumption falls, but prices go up

06 | 09 | 13

New figures are showing changes as wine consumption goes down and the average price goes up.

In its market consumer report for the summer, Bibendum comments that more people are prepared to spend up to £10 on a bottle - wines between £8 and £9 in value experienced 21 per cent more sales over the year. The average bottle price has gone up to £5.06 from £4.87.

The findings are interesting to anyone in the commercial kitchen or catering equipment industry as they show current trends on how consumers are spending money when dining.

Despite an upturn in bottle prices, the report states: "Consumers spending more expect a better quality product - a single bad experience will burn their fingers and cause them to return to old sub-£5 shopping habits."

By contrast, when it comes to on-trade selling, 52 per cent of people said they drink less when out, as it costs more when compared to other drinks. The data suggests people are not buying wine as frequently, but when they do more money is being spent.

It also stated that champagne - a long-time staple of quality restaurants - is back on the rise. Bibendum claims champagne is avoiding price promotions for business, focusing instead on a quality product. Consequently, the lower end of the market is reporting a drop in values.

Sparkling wine was the one category of wine to experience growth in both volume of sales and its value. Volume was up 13 per cent while the average value increased by ten per cent.

When it comes to wine types, the report suggests many people prefer rose. Seven per cent of 25 to 34-year-olds said it was their favourite, while six per cent of 45 to 54-year-olds agreed. This is the highest percentage in both.

The report also found that London had growth ahead of the country. Pub and restaurants experienced increased like-for-like sales of 1.8 per cent in the capital, in comparison to the flat rates throughout the country. It suggested "most opportunites coming from the casual dining sector" as part of this dynamic.ADNFCR-16001031-ID-801634729-ADNFCR


PageID: 9

BasketID: 0

AgentID: 371

VisitorID: 14965025