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Food firms adopt waste transfer system

10 | 07 | 13

Food and drink companies are among a number of businesses that are keen to adopt a new online system for transferring waste. 

The programme in question is called electronic duty of care (edoc), which has been developed by the Environment Agency to provide a free, modern alternative to the exchange of paper waste transfer notes (WTNs) that is still commonly used by businesses across a variety of industries. 

In a survey of companies across a number of different sectors, 72 per cent said they would be keen to use the system when it is rolled out in January 2014. 

The Environment Agency claims edoc will save both time and money by reducing paper and storage costs, as well as cutting out the need to manually search for and retrieve records.

Bernard Amos, chief executive of consultancy and contract management firm Helistrat, praised the new programme. 

"The edoc system is a brilliant idea and I’d encourage all companies to take it up. More and more we are moving towards paper-free ways of doing business and this makes perfect sense," he commented.

Edoc programme manager Chris Deed said the programme will help to reduce some of the administrative burden on modern organisations. 

"We surveyed the six sectors for which UK waste compliance has particular impact and found the majority of businesses were keen to take up the new online edoc system," he commented.

The Environment Agency said approximately 23 million paper WTNs are created in the UK each year, with around 50 million being stored at any one time, and if firms choose to adopt the edoc programme this number can be cut dramatically. 

The subject of waste in the food and catering industry has increasingly come under the spotlight in recent months. A campaign by the Waste and Resources Action Programme has called for restaurants to serve smaller portions, while a report by the Carbon Trust revealed many companies are wasting energy and money by using old, inefficient catering equipment.ADNFCR-16001031-ID-801610386-ADNFCR


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