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Children's charity calls for unwanted kitchen equipment

26 | 03 | 13

A children's charity has appealed to catering equipment suppliers to donate unwanted stock.

The NewLife Foundation for disabled children is looking for any surplus or redundant items. It will then either recycle these for use in a domestic environment or sell them on to raise funds, Catering Insight reports.

“If catering equipment companies are able to donate stock that is unwanted, returned and damaged, or redundant and end of line then we can then resell or recycle in our corporate home store and raise money for the charity,” commented Allison Timmins of the foundation.

She said the charity would like to receive any catering products that are re-saleable or recyclable, such as pots, pans, cutlery, baking ware, china and baking equipment. Any company that wishes to donate stock would need to do nothing more than offer the surplus items for free.
“We’ll set them up on our system as donors, arrange for free collection by our carriers and take away all items that are not required or redundant and we provide a free corporate recycling service.

“We exist to make profit, which we pass onto the charity and buy equipment for disabled children. We also fund a research centre at Great Ormond Street into genetic birth defects,” Ms Timmins stated.

In other catering equipment news, it has been revealed that the UK's supermarkets have exceeded their targets for reducing carbon emissions from refrigeration units.

Asda, Marks and Spencer, Morrisons, Sainsbury’s, Tesco, the Co-Operative and Waitrose saw their refrigeration-based emissions fall by 52 per cent in 2012, beating their target of 50 per cent.

Alice Ellison, the environment policy adviser at the British Retail Consortium, which reported these figures, said that new goals will now be set to continue this momentum.

“The retail industry is going above and beyond in its commitments to reducing its environmental impact across all aspects of its operations,” she commented.

Ms Ellison claimed that by continuing to innovate and collaborate in this space, retailers are helping the environment and providing better value for customers. ADNFCR-16001031-ID-801562733-ADNFCR


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