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CESA speaks out on BIM problems

19 | 09 | 13

The Catering Equipment Suppliers Association (CESA) has spoken out about the difficulties that may be faced by the catering industry when Building Information Modelling (BIM) comes into effect.

In 2016, legislation will be introduced that means all public-funded projects above a certain cost must use BMI 3D designs and modelling. CESA states that it may be a problem for catering equipment suppliers to produce BIM-compatible 3D models of their range due to various different formats to answer to.

Yet it is an area that caterers need to comply with - the largest restaurant, hotel and dining projects will be using BIM and, as such, looking for kitchen equipment that is compatible during this design process. Gaining experience and an understanding of the process before it becomes an industry standard may prove useful.

CESA's chair Nick Oryino said: "Catering equipment manufacturers have been concerned by the huge potential cost of creating these models, the more so since there are several BIM softwares available."

As a potential answer, CESA has also unveiled CESABIM, which will help produce 3D models that can be uploaded into any relevant format. The basic version of this - which offers simple models, the ability to upload into any BIM format and a price checking app - is free.

An advanced version is also available, offering dynamic models in configuration options. This includes software for kitchen, bar and restaurant designs.

Mr Oryino said: "CESABIM makes it easy to create BIM models and also to generate CAD blocks. This means it can replace the current CESACAD library."

A report from Opti-Cal Survey Equipment suggested small companies would be the most affected by BIM's arrival. Out of respondents with a company of ten or fewer employees, 76 per cent were only just starting to adopt it. Approximately 66 per cent of these small companies said current government initiatives make it difficult for them to compete for contracts.

The software will have its official launch and release in November this year at the CESA Conference.ADNFCR-16001031-ID-801639344-ADNFCR


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